Hacking & Security

12 Days competition: Day 10 - This bug was one shell of a shock

Sophos Naked Security - 12 Prosinec, 2014 - 13:49
Can you work out the answer to our question in Day 10 of our 12 Days of Christmas competition?

Las Vegas Sands' Casino Network hit by Destructive Malware

The Hacker News - 12 Prosinec, 2014 - 13:38
Sony Pictures Entertainment hack that started at the end of the last month and so far has caused a severe damage to its reputation as well as resources, from internal system shutdown to upcoming movies and scripts leak. Now, a similar cyber attack against Casino operator Las Vegas Sands Corp has been revealed that occurred on February 2014. The cyber attack occurred on this year’s February
Kategorie: Hacking & Security

GCHQ and police team up to hunt down child abusers on the darknet

Sophos Naked Security - 12 Prosinec, 2014 - 12:44
A major crackdown on child-abuse imagery includes a new law making it illegal for an adult to send a sexual communication to a child.

Senate passes cybersecurity bill

LinuxSecurity.com - 12 Prosinec, 2014 - 12:42
LinuxSecurity.com: The Senate passed a cybersecurity bill on Thursday to protect critical infrastructure. S. 1353, the Cybersecurity Act, permits the Secretary of Commerce to develop voluntary standards to reduce cyber risks to critical infrastructure, such as power grids.
Kategorie: Hacking & Security

Retailers are "overconfident" about their security, majority have fundamental gaps

Sophos Naked Security - 12 Prosinec, 2014 - 11:57
Happy holidays! Lots of us are shopping away, but a new report finds that retailers aren't doing enough to keep impish cyber crooks out of our business.

Sony Was Hacked in February and Chose to Stay Silent

LinuxSecurity.com - 12 Prosinec, 2014 - 11:57
LinuxSecurity.com: Sony says the recent breach of its servers and weeklong cyber humiliation is an "unprecedented" strike and an "unparalleled crime." If they're shocked by these events, they've been shocked for almost a year: leaked emails obtained by Gawker show security troubles dating back to February.
Kategorie: Hacking & Security

Iranian hackers used Visual Basic malware to wipe Vegas casino’s network

Ars Technica - 12 Prosinec, 2014 - 01:00

Stop us if this sounds familiar: a company executive does something that makes a foreign government’s leadership upset. A few months later, hackers break into the company’s network through a persistent cyber attack and plant malware that erases the contents of hard drives, shuts down e-mail servers and phone systems, and brings operations to a screeching halt.

That’s not just what happened to Sony Pictures Entertainment in late November—it’s also what happened to Las Vegas Sands Corp., owners of the Sands, Venetian, and Palazzo hotels and casinos, in a cyber attack that began last January. The attack and the damage it did were kept quiet by the company until it was reported in a story by Bloomberg Businessweek today.

Attempts to reach Las Vegas Sands Corp. have gone unanswered, and a spokesperson for Dell SecureWorks—which was brought in to clean up the mess afterward and determine its cause—declined to speak about the article, as it is the company’s policy not to discuss work done for a customer. But according to Bloomberg’s sources, the Sands attack was undertaken by “hacktivists” who were responding to a speech by Sands majority owner Sheldon Adelson. The billionaire 52-percent owner of the Sands and Israeli media mogul made an October 2013 appearance on a panel at the Manhattan campus of Yeshiva University, where he called for a nuclear attack on Iran to get the country to abandon its own nuclear program.

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Kategorie: Hacking & Security

Sony hackers could have slipped past 90% of defenses, FBI director says

Ars Technica - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 23:40

The malware that thoroughly penetrated Sony Pictures Entertainment was so sophisticated it likely would have worked against nine out of 10 security defenses available to companies, a top FBI official told members of Congress.

The comments, made under oath Wednesday by Joseph Demarest, assistant director of the FBI's cyber division, are the latest to largely let Sony officials off the hook. Last month's rooting of servers operated by Sony's movie division is believed to have exposed more than 100 gigabytes of data, including not only unreleased movies but, more importantly, personal details on tens of thousands of employees. Speaking before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee, Demarest's apologist comments closely resembled those reported earlier this week from the CEO of Mandiant, the security firm investigating the breach on behalf of Sony.

"The level of sophistication is extremely high and we can tell...that [the hackers] are organized and certainly persistent," Demarest said, according to IDG News. "In speaking with Sony and separately, the Mandiant security provider, the malware that was used would have slipped or probably gotten past 90% of Net defenses that are out there today in private industry and [likely] challenged even state government."

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Kategorie: Hacking & Security

Sony fights spread of stolen data by using “bad seed” attack on torrents

Ars Technica - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 21:20

Those trying to download files and films from the recent Sony Pictures Entertainment leak are being widely frustrated thanks to a large number of Torrent filesharing nodes that advertise fake “seeds." These files are offered via the Bittorrent file sharing protocol, and they match the signature of the stolen data while containing no usable content. Instead the bad seeds, which now may outnumber the computers actively sharing the actual files stolen from Sony, provide a download of corrupted or fake versions of the archive files for the vast majority of individuals attempting to access them.

According to a source at Sony that spoke with Re/Code, the company was using Amazon Web Services to run hundreds of virtual machines and distribute fake file versions to disrupt the Guardians of Peace (GoP) file dumps. That is supported by analysis from security firm Adallom, which tracks the signature of files on torrent streams and other sources in order to watch for data breaches from client companies.

Tal Klein, vice president of strategy at Adallom, told Ars that starting yesterday, “all of a sudden we saw files matching the SHA1 signatures of the Sony torrents starting to be populated across all the torrent sites.” He said that the files were intelligently designed to have the same signature as the GoP file torrents—unlike earlier opportunistic attempts by malware distributors who packaged malware using the same filenames used by the GoP file dumps. [The SHA1 signature is in the metadata provided with the seed, not a result of a file that causes a SHA1 "collision" by matching the file's exact hash.]

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Kategorie: Hacking & Security

Custom Websites Running HD FLV Player Plugin Vulnerable to Attack

Threatpost - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 20:39
CMS providers Joomla and WordPress have patched an arbitrary file download vulnerability in the HD FLV Player plug-in, but custom websites running the plug-in independently remain at risk.
Kategorie: Hacking & Security

Researcher: ‘Lax’ Crossdomain Policy Puts Yahoo Mail At Risk

Threatpost - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 19:23
A security researcher disclosed a problem with a loose cross-domain policy for Flash requests on Yahoo Mail that puts email content and contacts at risk.
Kategorie: Hacking & Security

‘Poodle’ Bug Returns, Bites Big Bank Sites

Krebs on Security - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 19:06

Many of the nation’s top banks, investment firms and credit providers are vulnerable to a newly-discovered twist on a known security flaw that exposes Web site traffic to eavesdropping. The discovery has prompted renewed warnings from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security advising vulnerable Web site owners to address the flaw as quickly as possible.

In mid-October, the world learned about “POODLE,” an innocuous acronym for a serious security flaw in a specific version (version 3.0) of Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), the technology that most commercial Web sites use to protect the privacy and security of communications with customers.

When you visit a site that begins with “https://” you can be sure that the data that gets transmitted between that site and your browser cannot be read by anyone else. That is, unless those sites are still allowing traffic over SSL 3.0, in which case an attacker could exploit the POODLE bug to decrypt and extract information from inside an encrypted transaction — including passwords, cookies and other data that can be used to impersonate the legitimate user.

On Dec. 8, researchers found that the POODLE flaw also extends to certain versions of a widely used SSL-like encryption standard known as TLS (short for Transport Layer Security).

“The impact of this problem is similar to that of POODLE, with the attack being slightly easier to execute,” wrote Ivan Ristic, director of engineering at security firm Qualys, which made available online a free scanning tool that evaluates Web sites for the presence of the POODLE vulnerability, among other problems. “The main target are browsers, because the attacker must inject malicious JavaScript to initiate the attack.”

A cursory review using Qualys’s SSL/TLS scanning tool indicates that the Web sites for some of the world’s largest financial institutions are vulnerable to the new POODLE bug, including Bank of AmericaChase.comCitibankHSBC, Suntrust — as well as retirement and investment giants Fidelity.com and Vanguard (click links to see report). Dozens of sites offering consumer credit protection and other services run by Experian also are vulnerable, according to SSL Labs. Qualys estimates that about 10 percent of Web servers are vulnerable to the POODLE attack against TLS.

According to an advisory from the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT), a partnership run in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, although there is currently no fix for the vulnerability SSL 3.0 itself, disabling SSL 3.0 support in Web applications is the most viable solution currently available. US-CERT notes that some of the same researchers who discovered the Poodle vulnerability also developed a fix for the TLS-related issues.

Until vulnerable sites patch the issue, there isn’t a lot that regular users can do to protect themselves from this bug, aside from exercising some restraint when faced with the desire to log in to banking and other sensitive sites over untrusted networks, such as public Wi-Fi hotspots.

 

Kategorie: Hacking & Security

Microsoft Recalls Patch Tuesday Exchange Update

Threatpost - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 18:47
For the second month in a row, Microsoft is recalling a security update published along with its monthly patch Tuesday release.
Kategorie: Hacking & Security

Black Energy Malware May Be Exploiting Patched WinCC Flaw

Threatpost - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 16:34
Experts at ICS-CERT say that the BlackEnergy malware that has been seen infecting human-machine interface systems may be exploiting a recently patched vulnerability in the Siemens SIMATIC WinCC software in order to compromise some systems.
Kategorie: Hacking & Security

The Fascinating Story of DRM, Part One: Wario’s Woes

InfoSec Institute Resources - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 14:00

When I was a little girl, I loved playing Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego? and Where in Time is Carmen Sandiego? When my father bought me the MS-DOS versions of those games, I thought it was really cool that each game came with a reference book, The World [...]

The post The Fascinating Story of DRM, Part One: Wario’s Woes appeared first on InfoSec Institute.

Kategorie: Hacking & Security

12 Days competition: Day 9 - This musical gift gave you too much

Sophos Naked Security - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 13:45
Can you work out the answer to our question in Day 9 of our 12 Days of Christmas competition?

Microsoft: US would be outraged if another nation ransacked its servers

Sophos Naked Security - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 13:19
That's exactly what the US is doing, Microsoft says: trying to sidestep international law by demanding a customer's email from servers in another country.

Facebook head of AI wants to stop you from posting things you may later regret

Sophos Naked Security - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 13:01
Facebook AI is on track to stop you from drunkenly posting photos of yourself at a party for all the world (and your mom, and your boss) to see.

Mozilla to Support Certificate Transparency in Firefox

Threatpost - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 13:00
Mozilla is planning to add support for Certificate Transparency checks in Firefox in the near future, but the company says that the feature won't be turned on by default at first.
Kategorie: Hacking & Security

Kaspersky Security Bulletin 2014. A Look into the APT Crystal Ball

Kaspersky Securelist - 11 Prosinec, 2014 - 13:00

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  1. Predictions 2015
  2. Overall statistics for 2014
  3. Malware Evolution
  4. A Look into the APT Crystal Ball

Over the past years, Kaspersky's Global Research and Analysis Team (GReAT) has shed light on some of the biggest APT campaigns, including RedOctober, Flame, NetTraveler, Miniduke, Epic Turla, Careto/Mask and others. While studying these campaigns we have also identified a number of 0-day exploits, including the most recent CVE-2014-0546. We were also among the first to report on emerging trends in the APT world, such as cyber mercenaries who can be contracted to launch lightning attacks or more recently, attacks through unusual vectors such as hotel Wi-Fi. Over the past years, Kaspersky Lab's GReAT team has monitoring more than 60 threat actors responsible for cyber-attacks worldwide, organizations which appear to be fluent in many languages such as Russian, Chinese, German, Spanish, Arabic, Persian and others.

By closely observing these threat actors, we put together a list of what appear to be the emerging threats in the APT world. We think these will play an important role in 2015 and deserve special attention, both from an intelligence point of view but also with technologies designed to stop them.

The merger of cyber-crime and APT

For many years, cyber-criminal gangs focused exclusively on stealing money from end users. An explosion of credit card theft, hijacking of electronic payment accounts or online banking connections led to consumer losses in the worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Maybe this market is no longer so lucrative, or maybe the cybercriminal market is simply overcrowded, but it now seems like there is a struggle being waged for 'survival'. And, as usual, that struggle is leading to evolution.

What to expect: In one incident we recently investigated attackers compromised an accountant's computer and used it to initiate a large transfer with their bank. Although it might seem that this is nothing very unusual, we see a more interesting trend: Targeted attacks directly against banks, not their users.

In a number of incidents investigated by Kaspersky Lab experts from the Global Research and Analysis Team, several banks were breached using methods straight out of the APT playbook. Once the attackers got into the banks' networks, they collected enough information to enable them to steal money directly from the bank in several ways:

  • Remotely commanding ATMs to dispense cash.
  • Performing SWIFT transfers from various customer accounts,
  • Manipulating online banking systems to perform transfers in the background.

These attacks are an indication of a new trend that is embracing APT style attacks in the cybercriminal world. As usual, cybercriminals prefer to keep it simple: they now attack the banks directly because that's where they money is.  We believe this is a noteworthy trend that will become more prominent in 2015.

Fragmentation of bigger APT groups

2014 saw various sources expose APT groups to the public eye. Perhaps the best-known case is the FBI indictment of five hackers on various computer crimes:

This public "naming and shaming" means we expect some of the bigger and "noisier" APT groups to shatter and break into smaller units, operating independently.

What to expect: This will result in a more widespread attack base, meaning more companies will be hit, as smaller groups diversify their attacks. At the same time, it means that bigger companies that were previously compromised by two or three major APT groups (eg. Comments Crew and Wekby) will see more varied attacks from a wider range of sources.

Evolving malware techniques

As computers become more sophisticated and powerful, operating systems also become more complex. Both Apple and Microsoft have spent a lot of time improving the security posture of their respective operating systems. Additionally, special tools such as Microsoft's EMET are now available to help thwart targeted attacks against software vulnerabilities.

With Windows x64 and Apple Yosemite becoming more popular, we expect APT groups to update their toolsets with more powerful backdoors and technologies to evade security solutions.

What to expect: Today, we are already seeing APT groups constantly deploying malware for 64-bit systems, including 64-bit rookits. In 2015, we expect to see more sophisticated malware implants, enhanced evasion techniques and more use of virtual file systems (such as those from Turla and Regin) to conceal precious tools and stolen data.

While we see these increases in advanced techniques, some attackers are moving in the opposite direction. While minimizing the number of exploits and amount of compiled code they introduce to compromised networks altogether, their work continues to require sophisticated code or exploit introduction at a stable entry into the enterprise, script tools and escalation of privilege of all sorts, and stolen access credentials at victim organizations.

As we saw with BlackEnergy 2 (BE2), attackers will actively defend their own presence and identity within victim networks once discovered. Their persistence techniques are becoming more advanced and expansive. These same groups will step up the amount and aggression of destructive last effort components used to cover their tracks, and they include more *nix support, networking equipment, and embedded OS support. We have already seen some expansion from BE2, Yeti, and Winnti actors.

New methods of data exfiltration

The days when attackers would simply activate a backdoor in a corporate network and start siphoning terabytes of information to FTP servers around the world are long gone. Today, more sophisticated groups use SSL on a regular basis alongside custom communication protocols.

Some of the more advanced groups rely on backdooring networking devices and intercepting traffic directly for commands. Other techniques we have seen include exfiltration of data to cloud services, for instance via the WebDAV protocol (facilitates collaboration between users in editing and managing documents and files stored on web servers).

These in turn have resulted in many corporations banning public cloud services such as Dropbox from their networks. However, this remains an effective method of bypassing intrusion detection systems and DNS blacklists.

What to expect: In 2015, more groups to adopt use of cloud services  in order to make exfiltration stealthier and harder to notice.

New APTs from unusual places as more countries join the cyber arms race

In February 2014, we published research into Careto/Mask, an extremely sophisticated threat actor that appears to be fluent in Spanish, a language rarely seen in targeted attacks. In August, we also released a report on Machete, another threat actor using the Spanish language.

Before that, we were accustomed to observing APT actors and operators that are fluent in relatively few languages. Additionally, many professionals do not use their native language, preferring instead to write in perfect English.

In 2014, we observed a lot of nations around the world publicly expressing an interest in developing APT capabilities:

What to expect: Although we haven't yet seen APT attacks in Swedish, we do predict that more nations will join the "cyber-arms" race and develop cyber-espionage capabilities.

Use of false flags in attacks

Attackers make mistakes. In the vast majority of the cases we analyze, we observe artifacts that provide clues about the language spoken by the attackers. For instance, in the case of RedOctober and Epic Turla, we concluded that the attackers were probably fluent in the Russian language. In the case of NetTraveler we came to the conclusion that attackers were fluent in Chinese.

In some cases, experts observe other meta features that could point toward the attackers. For example, performing file timestamp analysis of the files used in an attack may lead to the conclusion in what part of the world most of the samples were compiled.

However attackers are beginning to react to this situation. In 2014 we observed several "false flag" operations where attackers delivered "inactive" malware commonly used by other APT groups. Imagine a threat actor of Western origin dropping a malware commonly used by a "Comment Crew," a known Chinese threat actor. While everyone is familiar with the "Comment Crew" malware implants, few victims could analyze sophisticated new implants. That can easily mislead people into concluding that the victim was hit by the Chinese threat actor.

What to expect: In 2015, with governments increasingly keen to "name and shame" attackers, we believe that APT groups will also carefully adjust their operations and throw false flags into the game.

Threat actors add mobile attacks to their arsenal

Although APT groups have been observed infecting mobile phones, this hasn't yet become a major trend. Perhaps the attackers wish to get data that isn't usually available on mobiles, or maybe not all of them have access to the technologies that can infect Android and iOS devices.

In 2014 we saw several new APT tools designed for infecting mobiles, for instance Hacking Team's Remote Control System mobile modules.

Additionally, during the Hong Kong protests in October 2014, attacks were seen against Android and iOS users which appear to be connected to APT operations.

Although a mobile phone might not have valuable documents and schematics, or geopolitical expansion plans for next 10 years, they can be a valuable source of contacts as well as listening points. We observed this with the RedOctober group, which had the ability to infect mobile phones and turn them into "Zakladka's", mobile bugs.

What to expect: In 2015, we anticipate more mobile-specific malware, with a focus on Android and jailbroken iOS.

APT+Botnet: precise attack + mass surveillance

In general, APT groups are careful to avoid making too much noise with their operations. This is why the malware used in APT attacks is much less widespread than common crimeware such as Zeus, SpyEye and Cryptolocker.

In 2014 we observed two APT groups (Animal Farm and Darkhotel) using botnets in addition to their regular targeted operations. Of course, botnets can prove to be a vital asset in cyberwar and can be used to DDoS hostile countries; this has happened in the past.  We can therefore understand why some APT groups might want to build botnets in addition to their targeted operations.

In addition to DDoS operations, botnets can also offer another advantage - mass surveillance apparatus for a "poor country". For instance, Flame and Gauss, which we discovered in 2012, were designed to work as a mass surveillance tool, automatically collecting information from tens of thousands of victims. The information would have to be analyzed by a supercomputer, indexed and clustered by keywords and topics; most of it would probably be useless. However, among those hundreds of thousands of exfiltrated documents, perhaps one provides key intelligence details, that could make a difference in tricky situations.

What to expect: In 2015 more APT groups will embrace this trend of using precise attacks along with noisy operations and deploy their own botnets.

Targeting of hotel networks

The Darkhotel group is one of the APT actors known to have targeted specific visitors during their stay in hotels in some countries. Actually, hotels provide an excellent way of targeting particular categories of people, such as company executives. Targeting hotels is also highly lucrative because it provides intelligence about the movements of high profile individuals around the world.

Compromising a hotel reservation system is an easy way to conduct reconnaissance on a particular target. It also allows the attackers to know the room where the victim is staying, opening up the possibility of physical attacks as well as cyber-attacks.

It isn't always easy to target a hotel. This is why very few groups, the elite APT operators, have done it in the past and will use it as part of their toolset.

What to expect: In 2015, a few other groups might also embrace these techniques, but it will remain beyond the reach of the vast majority of APT players.

Commercialization of APT and the private sector

Over the last few years, we published extensive research into malware created by companies such as HackingTeam or Gamma International, two of the best known vendors of "legal spyware". Although these companies claim to sell their software only to "trusted government entities", public reports from various sources, including Citizen Lab, have repeatedly shown that spyware sales cannot be controlled. Eventually, these dangerous software products end up in the hands of less trustworthy individuals or nations, who can use them for cyber-espionage against other countries or their own people.

The fact is that such activities are highly profitable for the companies developing the cyber-espionage software. They are also low risk because – so far – we have not seen a single case where one of these companies was convicted in a cyber-espionage case. The developers of these tools are usually out of the reach of the law, because the responsibility falls with the tool users, not the company that develops and facilitates the spying.

What to expect: It's a high-reward, low risk business that will lead to the creation of more software companies entering the "legal surveillance tools" market. In turn, these tools will be used for nation-on-nation cyber-espionage operations, domestic surveillance and maybe even sabotage.

Conclusions

In general, 2014 was a rather sophisticated and diverse year for APT incidents. We discovered several zero-days, for instance CVE-2014-0515 which was used by a group we call "Animal Farm". Another zero-day we discovered was CVE-2014-0487, used by the group known as DarkHotel. In addition to these zero-days, we observed several new persistence and stealth techniques, which in turn resulted in the development and deployment of several new defense mechanisms for our users.

If we can call 2014 "sophisticated", the word for 2015 will be "elusive". We believe that more APT groups will become concerned with exposure and they will take more advanced measures to hide from discovery.

Finally, some of them will deploy false flag operations. We anticipate these developments and, as usual, will document them thoroughly in our reports.

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